Home
Home
4th death reported in NC 4th death reported in NC Legionnaires’ disease outbreak’ disease outbreak Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
เสาร์, 19 ตุลาคม 2019

by NEWS DESK  October 18, 2019


North Carolina public health officials have reported a fourth death linked to the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in people who attended the NC Mountain State Fair in Fletcher in September.


As of today, 141 cases of Legionnaires’ disease or Pontiac Fever had been reported in residents of multiple states and North Carolina counties who attended the fair.


The outbreak has been linked to the Davis Event Center of the WNC Ag Center, particularly near the hot tubs and during the last five days of the fair.

Legionella bacteria are found naturally in the environment. These bacteria can become a health concern when they grow and spread in human-made building water systems like hot water tanks, cooling towers of air conditioning systems, decorative fountains and hot tubs or spas that aren’t properly maintained. Approximately 200 cases are reported annually in North Carolina.

WHO: Ebola outbreak still a global public health emergency Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
เสาร์, 19 ตุลาคม 2019

reported by Healio October 18, 2019 

An emergency committee convened by WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, PhD, MSc, met for a fifth time to review the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or DRC, and determined that the outbreak still constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, or PHEIC.

“This outbreak remains a complex and dangerous outbreak,” Tedros said. “We need the full force of all partners to bring this outbreak under control and meet the needs of the people affected.”

The outbreak, which has been ongoing in an area of conflict in northeastern DRC since August 2018, has left 3,233 people infected and 2,157 dead. The PHEIC was initially declared on July 17 when the emergency committee met for the fourth time following confirmed cases in neighboring Uganda and the city of Goma. At the time, Tedros called the Goma case a “game-changer” in the outbreak.

Following the declaration, temporary recommendations were put in place to prevent further spread and interference with international traffic, including improving community awareness, engagement and participation in preventive and preparation strategies; continuing cross-border screenings to ensure no contacts are missed; enhancing coordination with the United Nations and other partners; and strengthening surveillance and measures to prevent nosocomial infections.

At the time, WHO stated the regulations and PHEIC would be reviewed at least every 3 months.

Tedros said during the most recent news conference that since declaring the PHEIC, “impressive progress” has been made. Weekly case counts have decreased each week for the last 4 weeks, falling from 100-plus cases to around 15. Additionally, the outbreak has been contained in former hotspots like Beni, and further transmission has been stopped in Goma and Uganda.

Tedros also noted that several new vaccination strategies have been successfully implemented, which has resulted in doubling the existing vaccine supply. Overall, almost 240,000 people have been vaccinated.

“This encouraging trend should be celebrated with caution,” Tedros said. “Though the outbreak has been contained, it’s been contained in a rural, difficult-to-reach place.”

“Every case has the ability to spark a new and bigger outbreak,” he added.

According to WHO, the PHEIC status will remain in place for at least 3 more months until the emergency committee reconvenes again. – by Caitlyn Stulpin


Disclosure: Tedros reports no relevant financial disclosures.


Raising Awareness of Valley Fever Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
พุธ, 16 ตุลาคม 2019

WRITTEN BY: Carmen Leitch  OCT 14, 2019 


Valley fever primarily occurs in Arizona and California, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s caused by a fungus called Coccidioides that lives in soils in the southwestern United States, some parts of Mexico, Central and South America, and has also been identified in south-central Washington State. Individuals only have to breathe air that’s carrying microscopic fungal spores to become infected. Poeple cannot get the illness from infected individuals or animals. Once the spores enter the body, they change form in the tissue, according to the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.


However, most people that are exposed to the fungus don’t get sick. About 10,000 people are diagnosed with Valley fever every year. Symptoms resemble the flu, and may include fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, fever, headache, muscle aches, joint pain, and an upper body or leg rash.

Because these symptoms occur in so many different illnesses, Valley fever can be extremely difficult to diagnose (and the number of infected individuals may be higher). Some people wait months for a diagnosis, and sometimes the symptoms resolve on their own with no treatment. In severe cases, antifungal medications can keep the infection from progressing. It’s thought that around forty percent of people infected with Valley Fever have to be hospitalized. The CDC estimates that the average case of Valley fever that requires hospitalization costs nearly $50,000. It can cause serious lung infections and might be confused with other respiratory disorders, including lung cancer.

The CDC is working to spread awareness of the disease among the public and clinicians. They are also trying to develop better tools that can identify the Coccidioides fungus. Valley fever can strike people of all ages, but certain groups may be at higher risk, like people with weak immune systems, diabetics or pregnant women.

Right now, there is no vaccine for the illness. People that live in or have traveled to areas where the fungus exists are encouraged to be vigilant and that if they start to have symptoms of Valley fever, they should ask their doctor to test for it.


หมอแนะ! รณรงค์ไม่ กอด-หอม ลูกคนอื่น เผยเด็กเล็กเสี่ยงติดเชื้อง่าย Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
พุธ, 16 ตุลาคม 2019

โดย ผู้สื่อข่าวออนไลน์ CM108 (3) รายงานวันที่ 15/10/2019

      หมอหมอมนูญ ลีเชวงวงศ์ ได้เปิดเผยเรื่องราวจากกรณีข่าวในสังคมออนไลน์เรื่องการแพร่เชื้อจากผู้ใหญ่สู่เด็ก อาจทำให้เกิดอันตรายต่อชีวิตของเด็ก หลังจาก อุ้ม ลักขณา ดาราชื่อดังออกมาวอน อย่าสัมผัสลูก กลัวลูกติดเชื้อโรค กุมารแพทย์ก็เห็นด้วย แนะนำให้ผู้ใหญ่ล้างมือด้วยสบู่หรือแอลกอฮอล์เจลก่อนจับเด็ก อุ้มเด็ก ถ้ารู้ว่าตัวเองป่วย ต้องใส่หน้ากากอนามัย งดหอมแก้มเด็ก

     ในทางตรงกันข้าม เด็กเล็กสามารถแพร่เชื้อให้กับปู่ ย่า ตา ยาย คนสูงอายุในบ้าน ซึ่งอาจมีโรคประจำตัวเช่นโรคถุงลมโป่งพอง โรคหอบหืด โรคหัวใจขาดเลือด โรคเบาหวาน เมื่อรับเชื้อไวรัสทางเดินหายใจจากเด็กเล็ก ซึ่งกำลังระบาดขณะนี้เช่นเชื้อไวรัส RSV ไข้หวัดใหญ่ เชื้อ human metapneumovirus เชื้อ Rhinovirus คนสูงอายุอาจป่วยหนัก บางคนถึงขั้นใส่เครื่องช่วยหายใจ นอนในรพ.เป็นเดือน และในที่สุดอาจเสียชีวิตได้ ทางที่ดี ถ้าเด็กเล็กป่วย คนสูงอายุในบ้านควรอยู่ห่างๆเด็ก อย่าไปอุ้ม คลุกคลีกับเด็กเล็ก ถ้าต้องเข้าใกล้ ควรใส่หน้ากากอนามัย และหลังจากสัมผัสเด็กที่ป่วย รีบล้างมือด้วยสบู่ หรือแอลกอฮอล์เจล อย่านำมือที่สัมผัสเด็กที่ป่วยมาจับจมูก ปาก หรือขยี้ตาตัวเอง

     ผู้ป่วยชายไทยอายุ 63 ปี เป็นโรคเบาหวาน ความดันโลหิตสูง ไขมันในเลือดสูง มาโรงพยาบาลด้วยอาการไอ ไอมากไอทั้งวันทั้งคืน มีเสมหะ มีน้ำมูก ปวดหัว ปวดตัว มีไข้สูง 2 วัน ไม่เจ็บคอ ในบ้านมีเด็กเล็ก 2 คนเพิ่งหายป่วย คนแรกหลานอายุ 3 ขวบ 10 เดือนป่วย ตรวจยืนยันเป็น RSV 2 สัปดาห์ก่อน ต่อมาหลานคนที่ 2 อายุ 1 ขวบ 9 เดือน ป่วยติดจากหลานคนแรก ตรวจยืนยันเป็นโรค RSV เมื่อ 1 สัปดาห์ก่อน ตรวจร่างกายผู้ป่วย อุณหภูมิ 38.8 องศาเซลเซียส ได้ตรวจล้วงจมูกส่งหาไข้หวัดใหญ่และ RSV ผลตรวจพบ RSV คงติดเชื้อ RSV จากหลานคนที่ 2 ให้การรักษาตามอาการ ไอดีขึ้นช้าๆ

     ครอบครัวไหนที่มีเด็กเล็กอายุน้อยกว่า 5 ขวบในบ้าน เตรียมตัวรับมือกับโรคติดเชื้อที่กำลังระบาด เด็กเล็กจะรับเชื้อจากเพื่อนร่วมชั้นในโรงเรียนอนุบาล แล้วกลับมาแพร่เชื้อต่อที่บ้านให้เด็กเล็กคนอื่นๆ และผู้ใหญ่ในบ้าน เด็กเล็กส่วนใหญ่จะหายเร็ว คนสูงอายุโดยเฉพาะคนที่มีโรคประจำตัวจะหายช้า


หมอแนะ! รณรงค์ไม่ กอด-หอม ลูกคนอื่น เผยเด็กเล็กเสี่ยงติดเชื้อง่าย Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
พุธ, 16 ตุลาคม 2019

โดย ผู้สื่อข่าวออนไลน์ CM108 (3) รายงานวันที่ 15/10/2019

      หมอหมอมนูญ ลีเชวงวงศ์ ได้เปิดเผยเรื่องราวจากกรณีข่าวในสังคมออนไลน์เรื่องการแพร่เชื้อจากผู้ใหญ่สู่เด็ก อาจทำให้เกิดอันตรายต่อชีวิตของเด็ก หลังจาก อุ้ม ลักขณา ดาราชื่อดังออกมาวอน อย่าสัมผัสลูก กลัวลูกติดเชื้อโรค กุมารแพทย์ก็เห็นด้วย แนะนำให้ผู้ใหญ่ล้างมือด้วยสบู่หรือแอลกอฮอล์เจลก่อนจับเด็ก อุ้มเด็ก ถ้ารู้ว่าตัวเองป่วย ต้องใส่หน้ากากอนามัย งดหอมแก้มเด็ก

     ในทางตรงกันข้าม เด็กเล็กสามารถแพร่เชื้อให้กับปู่ ย่า ตา ยาย คนสูงอายุในบ้าน ซึ่งอาจมีโรคประจำตัวเช่นโรคถุงลมโป่งพอง โรคหอบหืด โรคหัวใจขาดเลือด โรคเบาหวาน เมื่อรับเชื้อไวรัสทางเดินหายใจจากเด็กเล็ก ซึ่งกำลังระบาดขณะนี้เช่นเชื้อไวรัส RSV ไข้หวัดใหญ่ เชื้อ human metapneumovirus เชื้อ Rhinovirus คนสูงอายุอาจป่วยหนัก บางคนถึงขั้นใส่เครื่องช่วยหายใจ นอนในรพ.เป็นเดือน และในที่สุดอาจเสียชีวิตได้ ทางที่ดี ถ้าเด็กเล็กป่วย คนสูงอายุในบ้านควรอยู่ห่างๆเด็ก อย่าไปอุ้ม คลุกคลีกับเด็กเล็ก ถ้าต้องเข้าใกล้ ควรใส่หน้ากากอนามัย และหลังจากสัมผัสเด็กที่ป่วย รีบล้างมือด้วยสบู่ หรือแอลกอฮอล์เจล อย่านำมือที่สัมผัสเด็กที่ป่วยมาจับจมูก ปาก หรือขยี้ตาตัวเอง

     ผู้ป่วยชายไทยอายุ 63 ปี เป็นโรคเบาหวาน ความดันโลหิตสูง ไขมันในเลือดสูง มาโรงพยาบาลด้วยอาการไอ ไอมากไอทั้งวันทั้งคืน มีเสมหะ มีน้ำมูก ปวดหัว ปวดตัว มีไข้สูง 2 วัน ไม่เจ็บคอ ในบ้านมีเด็กเล็ก 2 คนเพิ่งหายป่วย คนแรกหลานอายุ 3 ขวบ 10 เดือนป่วย ตรวจยืนยันเป็น RSV 2 สัปดาห์ก่อน ต่อมาหลานคนที่ 2 อายุ 1 ขวบ 9 เดือน ป่วยติดจากหลานคนแรก ตรวจยืนยันเป็นโรค RSV เมื่อ 1 สัปดาห์ก่อน ตรวจร่างกายผู้ป่วย อุณหภูมิ 38.8 องศาเซลเซียส ได้ตรวจล้วงจมูกส่งหาไข้หวัดใหญ่และ RSV ผลตรวจพบ RSV คงติดเชื้อ RSV จากหลานคนที่ 2 ให้การรักษาตามอาการ ไอดีขึ้นช้าๆ

     ครอบครัวไหนที่มีเด็กเล็กอายุน้อยกว่า 5 ขวบในบ้าน เตรียมตัวรับมือกับโรคติดเชื้อที่กำลังระบาด เด็กเล็กจะรับเชื้อจากเพื่อนร่วมชั้นในโรงเรียนอนุบาล แล้วกลับมาแพร่เชื้อต่อที่บ้านให้เด็กเล็กคนอื่นๆ และผู้ใหญ่ในบ้าน เด็กเล็กส่วนใหญ่จะหายเร็ว คนสูงอายุโดยเฉพาะคนที่มีโรคประจำตัวจะหายช้า


วงการเล็บเจล ต้องสะเทือน! เสี่ยงติดเชื้อ HIV และเป็นมะเร็งผิวหนัง Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
จันทร์, 07 ตุลาคม 2019

ข่าวสด รายงาน วันที่ 7 ตุลาคม 2562

วงการเล็บเจล ต้องสะเทือน! ผลเสียอันตรายกว่าที่คิด!! เสี่ยงติดเชื้อ HIV และเป็นมะเร็งผิวหนัง

วงการเล็บเจล ดูไอเดียเล็บเจลสวยๆ กันมาเยอะแล้ว ขอมาพูดถึงอีกด้านของการทำเล็บเจลกันบ้างดีกว่า เพราะไม่นานมานี้พึ่งได้ยินข่าวที่น่าตกใจเกี่ยวกับเรื่องการติดเชื้อจากการทำเล็บมา งั้นวันนี้มาดูผลเสียของการทำเล็บเจลกันบ้างนะ บอกเลยว่า 5 ข้อนี้ บางข้ออันตรายแบบคาดไม่ถึงเลยค่ะซิส

#1. ทำร้ายหน้าเล็บ

สาวเรารู้อยู่เต็มอกสำหรับข้อนี้ เพราะการเข้าร้านทำเล็บเจลนั้น เราจะเห็นได้ชัดเจนว่าเล็บของเราโดนขูด และตะไบสีเจลเก่าออก ผงๆ ที่หผุดดออกมาคือ หน้าเล็บของเราที่โดนทำร้าย ยิ่งนานวันเข้ายิ่งอ่อนแอ ยิ่งบางและมันทำให้เล็บของเราฉีกขาดง่ายขึ้น เพราะหน้าเล็บไม่แข็งแรง

#2.โคนเล็บและจมูกเล็บด้าน

เนื่องจากทุกครั้งที่เราทำเล็บเจลจะต้องมีการตะไบ และเค้าก็จะใช้อุปกรณ์ทำเล็บแซะๆ โคนเล็บของเราเคลียร์เล็บให้พร้อมต่อการลงเจล และตรงนี้ล่ะที่ มันจะทำให้โคนเล็บและจมูกเล็บที่โดนเสียดสีมากๆ ด้านและแห้งแตกง่ายกว่าปกติ

#3. เสี่ยงต่อการติดเชื้อ

การทำเล็บเจลติดต่อกันเป็นเวลลานานๆ ยิ่งทำให้เล็บของเราอ่อนแอ และอาจเกิดการติดเชื้อได้ เพราะน้ำยาล้างเล็บนั้นสามารถทำให้เล็บของเรา และผิวหนังบริเวณรอบๆ เกิดการแพ้ ระคายเคือง และนำไปสู่การติดเชื้อนั้นเองจ้า

#4. เครื่องอบสีเจล ทำให้เป็นมะเร็งผิวหนัง

ใช่แล้วซิสสส! การทำเล็บเจลทำให้เป็นมะเร็งผิวหนังได้นะ เพราะว่าเครื่องอบเล็บเจลที่เราใช้กัน โดยมีไอแสงสีม่วงๆ ที่ออกมานั้นคือ รังสี UV ที่ทำให้เราดำนั้นแหละค่ะ แต่ถ้าเราได้รับมันในปริมาณที่เข้มข้นมากจนเกินไปและต่อเนื่อง ในระยะยาวมันก่อให้เกิดมะเร็งผิวหนังนั้นเอง วิธีหลีกเลี่ยงคือ ทากันแดดที่มือก่อนอบเล็บ หรือสวมถุงมือนะคะ

#5. เสี่ยงเลือดบวก

งงมั้ยคะ ฉันแค่ทำเล็บเจลจะเลือดบวดได้ไง การติดเชื้อ HIV จากการทำเล็บได้เกิดขึ้นแล้วค่ะ ภัยเงียบที่เราไม่สามารถรู้ได้เลย เพราะลูกค้าที่มาทำเล็บที่ร้านเราไม่รู้ว่าเค้ามีเชื้อมั้ย หากก่อนทำเล็บเจลต้องใช้อุปกรณ์ทำเล็บ ที่มีการตัดแต่งเล็บ หรืออะไรที่สามารถทำให้เกิดบาดแผลได้ ราควรเลือกร้านที่มีตู้อบฆ่าเชื้ออุปกรณ์นะคะ เลือกให้ปลอดภัย กันเอาไว้ดีกว่าค่ะ

อึ้งไปเลยใช่มั้ยล่ะ แค่ทำเล็บสวยๆ เก๋ๆ แต่อันตรายกว่าที่คิดไว้มาก รู้แบบนี้แล้วก็เลือกร้านที่ปลอดภัยกันนะคะ เช็คก่อนจะไปตัดเล็บ ทำเล็บที่ไหนว่าอุปกรณ์นั้นผ่านการฆ่าเชื้อรึเปล่า แล้วก็ดูแลรักษาเล็บกันด้วยนะคะ ให้น้องได้พักฟื้นตัวกลับมาแข็งแรง เป็นเล็บที่สุขภาพดี


A researcher obtained samples from a gorilla carcass. Scientists had hoped to predict human outbreak Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
จันทร์, 14 ตุลาคม 2019

Credit Wildlife Conservation Society  By Donald G. McNeil Jr.  Oct. 14, 2019

The worst part of sampling a dead gorilla for Ebola, said Dr. William B. Karesh, is the flies.

“You can imagine the sense of panic,” he said. “A hundred thousand ants and carrion flies are coming off the carcass or climbing up your arms. They get inside your hood and are crawling on your face or biting you.

“After half an hour, you have to get out and pull off the hood, clean up and disinfect. It’s not for the faint of heart.”

The task described by Dr. Karesh — a former chief field veterinarian at the Wildlife Conservation Society, which runs New York’s zoos — was part of an unusual research project. Scientists were trying to predict human Ebola outbreaks by detecting them first in apes and other forest animals.

The team recently published a study in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B detailing 12 years of this work in the Republic of Congo.


In some ways the study, which lasted from 2006 to 2018, was a failure. Only 58 samples were gathered from dead animals, and none was positive for Ebola. Therefore, the team’s hypothesis — that animal sampling could be an early warning system for human outbreaks — was not proved.

The good news, however, was that there was no epidemic. From 1994 to 2003, there had been multiple human outbreaks of Ebola in the Republic of Congo or neighboring Gabon. Weeks or months before each one, dead gorillas and chimpanzees were reported, sometimes hundreds of them. (Those die-offs contributed to the classification of western lowland gorillas as critically endangered.)

Sarah H. Olson, a W.C.S. wildlife health specialist working in the Republic of Congo and a co-author of the study, conceded that carcass surveillance had been “a massive, massive challenge.” But other components of the program, she argued, were highly successful.

For example, she said, public-education teams visited hunting villages across a wide swath of the country to explain why it was dangerous to eat or even touch animals found dead. The educators also put up posters and aired radio spots.

Previously, she said, “people saw dead animals as a gift from God, food they didn’t have to work for.”

Editors’ Picks

Many, but not all, human outbreaks of Ebola have been traced to eating carcasses. But the biggest — the West African outbreak that began in late 2013 and killed more than 11,000 people — did not begin this way. That outbreak is thought to have started when a child played inside a tree where Ebola-infected bats roosted and left droppings.

After years of education efforts in the Republic of Congo, “people there adamantly told us they don’t eat carcasses any more,” Dr. Olson said. “That’s a big change.”


The teams also trained local veterinarians and park rangers to don protective gear to do tests safely, and helped the national laboratory in the Republic of Congo’s capital, Brazzaville, improve its Ebola testing for both animals and humans.

The work was supported by the United States Agency for International Development’s $200 million Predict program, a ten-year effort to find animal diseases that could jump to humans.

Other funders included the Fish and Wildlife Service, the German government and several private foundations.

Perhaps the most intriguing part of the study was the authors’ descriptions of how incredibly difficult it is to even find dead animals in a dense rain forest, and then to safely take samples from them.

ADVERTISEMENT


The first obstacle is that sick animals often crawl off to die in thick brush or near water.

“It’s not like they’re laying out on a golf course,” Dr. Karesh said. “In the first day or two, hunters can pass one by and not even know it’s there. Later, they smell it or they even hear the flies.”

Dr. Alain U. Ondzie, a W.C.S. veterinarian in the Republic of Congo, described a terrifying moment for a team he was leading through the jungle in 2007. They had been walking and camping for eight days and had run out of water.

When they finally came across a rivulet, the porters and trackers threw themselves on the ground to drink. Only then did one spot a dead gorilla in the water just upstream.

“They cried, ‘It’s all over for us — we’ll be dead before we reach a village,’” Dr. Ondzie said. “We were very fortunate later to learn the carcass was not positive.”

The research program relied heavily on asking local hunters to report carcasses. Most hunters are from the Mbenga subgroup of the forest-dwellers known as pygmies. (The term is often seen as pejorative but there is no uniformly accepted substitute; subgroups genetically related to one another are widely scattered across Central Africa, but share no common language or name.)

Many hunting villages are bound in virtual enslavement to local farming villages, Dr. Karesh explained, which complicates relationships with outsiders.

Also, impoverished hunters may not own cellphones, and even if they do, coverage is spotty. (Without phones, hunters send messages by asking passing drivers of logging trucks to relay the word when they reach the next town.)

ADVERTISEMENT


Despite the inevitable delays, sampling teams must rush to each carcass before scavengers finish it off. Many animals — including leopards, civets and smaller cats, crocodiles, mongoose, palm-nut vultures and even duikers, a kind of antelope — will dismember a carcass, carry off pieces and pick the bones clean.

For a team based in Brazzaville or another city, it may take several days — using a combination of 4x4s, pirogue canoes and walking — to reach a carcass.


On arrival, the team must clear a path to the carcass and then establish a perimeter about 60 feet back while the two designated samplers don hooded Tyvek suits with goggles and three pairs of gloves.

Working under those conditions in tropical heat can be excruciating, as Dr. Karesh explained. Other samplers described fogged goggles and cameras, and sweat running down their arms to form water balloons in the tips of their gloves, reducing their dexterity.

“It can be quite a fiddly thing,” said Dr. Eeva Kuisma, a W.C.S. technical adviser. She recalled being with a team that had to stand up in a dugout canoe trying to keep a test-tube rack balanced as they sampled a dead monkey snagged in an overhanging branch.

Dr. Olson described the delicate task as like using the tweezers in the child’s game Operation, always nervous that the buzzer will go off — but the stakes are higher because the carcasses, like human ones, can teem with live virus for up to a week.

ADVERTISEMENT


Merely living in the jungle can be nerve-racking, Dr. Kuisma added, because you are always aware that animals you cannot see are watching you.

She had never seen a leopard or been close to a large crocodile, she said, but the animals the trackers feared most were forest elephants, which lurked nearly invisibly in the leafy shadows.

“If you can even see one, you’re too close,” she said. “They’re usually not aggressive, but a mother with a calf may charge you.”

She herself had been charged by a male gorilla she startled while taking a morning jog on a logging road.

“You hear this shout — it’s kind of like a sharp bark,” she said. “And then they charge. It’s usually a mock charge, but that one made me do a 100-meter personal best.”

Despite the difficulties, Dr. Olson argued, ongoing surveillance and education programs are cheap to run and also build trust with local villagers — something vividly lacking in the current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where medical teams and treatment centers have been attacked.

The idea, she said, “deserves a closer look from the international community.”


Philippines dengue outbreak surpasses 300,000 case mark Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
เสาร์, 05 ตุลาคม 2019

by ROBERT HERRIMAN October 4, 2019


In June, Philippines Health Secretary, Francisco Duque III predicted the 2019 dengue fever outbreak in the country would see 240,000 cases by the end of the year.


Looking back, it appears Duque was being too conservative with his estimates.

According to the most recent numbers from the Epidemiology Bureau of the Department of Health, 307,704 dengue cases were reported nationwide, including 1,247 deaths through Sep. 14.

This is 116 percent higher that the same period last year when 142,783 cases were reported on the archipelago.

The regions reporting the most cases include Calabarzon, Western Visayas, Metro Manila and Central Luzon.

Health officials say children 14 and younger account for about six out of 10 cases.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection causing a severe flu-like illness and, sometimes causing a potentially lethal complication called severe dengue. Approximately, half of the world’s population is at risk and it affects infants, young children and adults. The incidence of dengue has increased 30-fold over the last 50 years. Up to 50-100 million infections are now estimated to occur annually in over 100 endemic countries, putting almost half of the world’s population at risk.



Maine Tickborne Diseases: ‘Steep increases’ reported with anaplasmosis, babesiosis Print
User Rating: / 0
News - News
เสาร์, 05 ตุลาคม 2019

by NEWS DESK  October 5, 2019 


The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report significant increases in two tickborne diseases–anaplasmosis and babesiosis–so far in 2019.

As of October 1, the CDC recorded 556 cases of anaplasmosis and 124 cases of babesiosis. That is an all-time annual high for babesiosis, and Maine is on track to surpass the record high of 663 cases of anaplasmosis set in 2017.

Concerning Lyme disease, the state’s most common tickborne illness, officials have recorded 684 cases since the beginning of the year. Public health officials in Maine expect total Lyme cases to exceed 1,000 when annual reporting for 2019 is complete.

Maine CDC urges the state’s residents and visitors to continue taking precautions against tickborne diseases during the year’s second peak season for tick activity, which takes place from October through November.

This has been one of the most active tick seasons we’ve ever seen in Maine – and it’s not over,” said Maine CDC Director Nirav D. Shah. “The risk of tickborne illnesses remains high through November, so we urge everyone to protect themselves from tick bites.”

The best way to prevent tickborne disease is to take preventive steps to avoid tick bites. Maine CDC suggests the No Ticks 4 ME approach, which includes:

  • Wearing protective clothing. Light-colored clothing makes ticks easier to see and long sleeves and pants reduce exposed skin.
  • Using an EPA-approved repellent and always following the label. Clothing and gear can be treated with permethrin for longer protection.
  • Using caution in tick-infested areas. Avoid wooded and bushy areas with high grass and stay in the middle of trails whenever possible.
  • Performing daily tick checks. Check for ticks immediately after exiting high-risk areas. Bathe or shower (preferably within 2 hours after being outdoors) to wash off and find ticks on your body. Conduct a full-body tick check. Also examine clothing, gear, and pets.


Anaplasmosis is caused by bacteria carried by infected deer ticks. Symptoms include fever, headache, malaise, and body aches. Anaplasmosis can be a serious illness if not treated promptly and correctly.

Babesiosis is caused by a parasite carried by infected deer ticks. Symptoms include extreme fatigue, aches, fever, chills, sweating, dark urine, and possibly anemia. Babesiosis can also be a serious illness if not treated promptly and correctly.

Lyme disease is caused by bacteria carried by infected deer ticks. The hallmark sign of the disease is a rash referred to as the “bull’s-eye” rash. This occurs in a little more than 50 percent of patients in Maine, usually within three to 30 days of a tick bite. Other symptoms include arthritis and heart problems.

 

Last Updated ( พุธ, 16 ตุลาคม 2019 )
<< Start < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 15 of 5315